Visit our BAC Favorite Places Web Page

Recent Posts

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 10
11
Technical Support / Re: wider front tires?
« Last post by Dwight Lakusta on May 19, 2019, 04:28:50 PM »
My compelling reason was, as I stated but here in more detail, the coach's steering axle weight full of fuel and water was right at or slightly above the weight bearing capacity of the Michelin 295s at their maximum pressure of 120 psi.  And the tires were showing stress cracks.  Also, my replacement 315s are Dunlops, not Michelin.  Five of the six rear tires are Toyos, one is Michelin.  That's another story.

The coach has the wider rims so I get "full value" of the Dunlop 315s, that being a weight bearing capacity of 9,090 lbs (if I remember that correctly) at 130 psi.  And the maximum pressure rating for the rims is 130 psi.

The morning cold pressures I use are 125 psi, 115 psi, and 110 psi going front to back on the three axles.  Interestingly, within an hour the 315s on the front will rise to 140 to 145 psi according to my TPMS.

Does your sticker on the wall say you have the 9” wheels? Or does it say 8.25 and you actually have The 9?
12
Mike,
The only thing that I have ever heard of with the acronym of MHD that could be associated to a battery is magnetohydrodynamic, which is the study of electrical conducting fluids like the electrolyte used in a battery. Personally, I would disregard the MHD when looking for a replacement battery, but be sure that they meet the minimum CCA rating.   

If your owners manual states that your coach came with post style chassis batteries, it is wrong. Your coach came with 3/8 inch stud connections on the OEM batteries.

Gerald
13
Hi Bill. I see now that MHD is = Mega Heavy Duty (sounds like a made up term). 

That MHD battery is listed as a "31P" (from what I can tell from picture of battery that is a "Post" terminal).

Since I need a "Stud" terminal, I guess I need the 31-MHD (which listed as a "T" style).

Nice how the warranty drops from 18 months for the 31P-MHD to 6 months for the 31-MHD.
14
Here's the Interstate size chart with the MHD 'definition'. For the two batteries with the MHD designation, they appear to weigh more (more lead, more capacity) than their siblings.

http://www.clarkegen.com/Libraries/PDF_Files/Specification_Sheet_-_Batteries.sflb.ashx

15
From Interstate battery chart, MHD means Mega Heavy Duty; Whatever that means!
16
 ::)
ha. I don't think so - my coach is pretty dumb.
17
Technical Support / Re: wider front tires?
« Last post by Mike Shumack on May 19, 2019, 03:40:57 PM »
Hi Dave.
So you have the wider rims - that's good. And a little more tread width on the pavement is nice too for added traction  ;)

FWIW - The 295 tires and 315 tires have a weight capacity/ratings above what our Coaches can handle. We can only put 7,650 lbs max on each tire without exceeding the axle and wheel load capacity.
18
In Smart cars, MHD means Micro Hybrid.  Could be?

19
I have a bad Chassis battery. I'm going to replace both. The '05 Patriot Owners manual says the Chassis batteries are "31P-MHD 950CCA and 195RC". The "P" is for post terminal (it appears), so I guess the previous owner changed the cables from post style to stud style at some point.  I have 3/8" stud terminals on all my batteries which I think is a better terminal connection method.

So looking for best pricing, I see the "Interstate" 31-MHD, Group 31T (950 CCA, 195 RC) for $166 each. And Sams Club has "Duracell" brand model 31C for $110 each (with same specs).

I know the Interstate brand is top of the line.
I don't know anything about the Duracell brand (other than the small AAA batteries). Does anyone have experience with Duracell group 31 batteries?

Also, what does the "MHD" stand for. I looked at a bunch of battery type charts and could not find MHD listed.
20
Technical Support / Re: wider front tires?
« Last post by David T. Richelderfer on May 19, 2019, 03:22:08 PM »
My compelling reason was, as I stated but here in more detail, the coach's steering axle weight full of fuel and water was right at or slightly above the weight bearing capacity of the Michelin 295s at their maximum pressure of 120 psi.  And the tires were showing stress cracks.  Also, my replacement 315s are Dunlops, not Michelin.  Five of the six rear tires are Toyos, one is Michelin.  That's another story.

The coach has the wider rims so I get "full value" of the Dunlop 315s, that being a weight bearing capacity of 9,090 lbs (if I remember that correctly) at 130 psi.  And the maximum pressure rating for the rims is 130 psi.

The morning cold pressures I use are 125 psi, 115 psi, and 110 psi going front to back on the three axles.  Interestingly, within an hour the 315s on the front will rise to 140 to 145 psi according to my TPMS.
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 10