Author Topic: BIODIESEL B2  (Read 2832 times)

George Gaston

  • Guest
BIODIESEL B2
« on: January 04, 2011, 09:26:43 PM »
I WAS LOOKING AT THE PACIFIC PRIDE WEB SITE AND WAS THINKING ABOUT GETTING SIGNED-UP.
CHECKING FOR LOCATIONS IN OREGON I FIND THAT THEY ONLY SHOW BIO DIESEL B2 AS BEING AVAILABLE.
CAN ANYONE GIVE ME SOME INPUT ABOUT USING BIO DIESEL IN MY 2007 CONTESSA WITH THE CAT C-9?
I WOULD APPRECIATE HEARING ANY PROS AND CONS ON THIS SUBJECT.

GEORGE GASTON
2007 CONTESSA
CAT C-9

Richard And Babs Ames

  • Guest
Re: BIODIESEL B2
« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2011, 01:22:34 AM »
http://catrvclub.org/new_fuel_recommendations[1].pdf This is the CAT side of the question.

George Gaston

  • Guest
Re: BIODIESEL B2
« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2011, 06:07:43 PM »
Thanks Richard. This is a very helpful document.

Joel Ashley

  • BAC Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1867
  • Thanked: 624 times
  • OSU Class of '73, Oregon Native. RVing 35 years
Re: BIODIESEL B2
« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2011, 02:52:24 AM »
We've been stuck at home for a couple of years, George, and haven't had to buy diesel in that time.  Your post prompted a little research on my part, and I discovered something that somehow got past me, but then I don't recall the subject being broached in the forums I frequent.  So perhaps this is as much news to some as it was to me, and maybe everyone else took it as common knowledge, I dunno.

Apparently Oregon, and some other states, passed legislation requiring a minimum biodiesel content in all diesel fuel sold.  So all of it is at least 2% biodiesel (B2), and some up to 5% (B5).  My understanding is that no one is particularly concerned about our engines' ability to tolerate that small a content.  Attached is a copy of one article I found:


"Oregon's 2 percent biodiesel (B2) requirement goes into effect on August 5 (2009), making it the third state supporting increased reliance on the cleaner-burning, domestically produced fuel. Oregon's biodiesel production capacity has reached five million gallons, which triggered the requirement.

Established as part of renewable energy legislation passed in 2007, nine counties in northwest Oregon will lead the adoption on August 5. The rest of the state will join by October 1.

Minnesota was the first state to enact a B2 requirement. In May, it was increased to B5. Washington State currently has a B2 requirement in place. Massachusetts will require diesel and home heating oil sold in the state to contain 2 percent biodiesel starting July 1, 2010. Pennsylvania also has a B2 requirement on the books, scheduled to be implemented January 1, 2010.

Biodiesel already has a significant presence in Oregon. The state is home to three biodiesel plants: Beaver Biodiesel in Albany, Green Fuels of Oregon in Klamath Falls, and SeQuential-Pacific Biodiesel in Salem. Also, biodiesel is a key part of the City of Portland's strategy to keep it as one of the greenest cities in the world. The city has used a minimum of 20 percent biodiesel in its fleet of several hundred diesel vehicles since 2004."

Unfortunately there is said to be a 4-6% loss in efficiency with the use of biodiesel, but I assume it's not that noticeable in such low per volume quantities as 2-5%.

-Joel ("next door" to ya in Sunnyside, OR)
PS- go through Pioneer Fuel to apply for your Pacific Pride membership, as they offer the motor home program:  www.pioneerfuel.com.  
« Last Edit: January 07, 2011, 03:02:53 AM by 77 »
Joel and Lee Rae Ashley
Clackamas, Oregon
36.9 ft. 2006 Monterey Ventura IV, aka"Monty Rae"
C9 400HP Cat
towing a 1997 Ford Explorer Limited, aka "Pearl"